Gay Outreach to Megachurches

Do Christians fear those they do not know? That seems to be the thinking behind this outreach to the megachurches in the US:

Austin, TX (PRWEB) April 10, 2008 — On Thursday, April 3, 2008, The Gay City News reported on a Family Research Council (FRC) fundraising letter devoted to the American Family Outing, a project that aims to create dialogue between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) families and members at six American mega-churches. The letter, dated March 2008 and signed by FRC President Tony Perkins, asks for $50,000 to create “Church Crisis Response Teams” to react to same-sex couples and their children who have expressed a desire to attend church and share a meal with families at the mega-churches between Mother’s Day and Father’s Day 2008.

“The frantic tone of the letter is a testament to the vital need for the American Family Outing. For too long, fear and dehumanization have kept people of faith divided over issues of sexual-orientation and gender-identity,” says Jeff Lutes, Soulforce Executive Director. The American Family Outing is a collaboration between Soulforce, COLAGE, the National Black Justice Coalition, and the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches.

We want those Christian brothers and sisters who have read terrible untruths about us to meet us and to know who we really are. We are those children of God who happen not to be straight and their straight allies who, like myself, grieve the fact that those who judge us do not really know us.
In late 2007, the four partner organizations wrote letters to:

* Rev. Joel Osteen and the Lakewood Church in Houston, Texas
* Bishop T.D. Jakes and The Potter’s House in Dallas, Texas
* Bishop Harry Jackson, Jr. and Hope Christian Church in Beltsville, Maryland
* Bishop Eddie Long and New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Lithonia, Georgia
* Rev. Bill Hybels and Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Illinois
* Dr. Rick Warren and Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California.

The letters set a date when the LGBT families will attend a worship service. The letters also invite each Pastor “to match our families with an equal number of families from your congregation” for a meal and conversation.

In contrast to the alarm bells sounded by Perkins, reaction from the churches and America’s diverse evangelical community has been more positive.

“We want those Christian brothers and sisters who have read terrible untruths about us to meet us and to know who we really are. We are those children of God who happen not to be straight and their straight allies who, like myself, grieve the fact that those who judge us do not really know us,” says Peggy Campolo, Baptist author and editor.

Campolo is one of several Christian leaders who are helping The American Family Outing reach out to the six mega-churches. Other clergy supporters include Rev. Jay Bakker, son of Jim Bakker and Tammy Faye Bakker-Messner, Rev. Gil Caldwell, Rev. Phil Lawson, and Rev. Troy Sanders.

Although The American Family Outing is a collaborative effort, the Family Research Council fundraising letter named only COLAGE, a social justice organization for children, youth, and adults with LGBTQ parents.

“Tony Perkins probably knows, as well as we do, that when children, youth and families speak truth to power, we expose the injustice of the Family Research Council’s discriminatory agenda,” shared Beth Teper, COLAGE Executive Director. “His letter and fundraising ploy demonstrate the great significance of a simple invitation — for six mega-church communities to meet our members and hear our message of acceptance and unity.”

Thanks to Teddy for contributing this article from http://www.prweb.com/releases/2008/04/prweb842604.htm


3 thoughts on “Gay Outreach to Megachurches

  1. Yes, I think some Christians do hate gays, or are extremely threatened by them, and react out of fear. I think they feel that if they seem at all tolerant, then they are somehow condoning homosexual acts that the Bible says are sin.

    Reactions out of fear are simply not Christian. God did not give us a spirit of fear but of love, power and a sound mind. So, fearful reactions need to be set aside as not of God. We need to love others, including the gay community, not fear or hate them.

    This doesn’t mean we have to accept homosexual acts as OK, when we believe the Bible tells us differently. But we are to act out of love, not bullying, not manipulating, coercing or pressuring other people to change when they do not want to or aren’t ready to. We don’t own them. God is their Father, and only He can do His work within us and others. If we want people to change, we need to pray for them, not act out of hatred and hostility. If we can’t act in love, then we need to pray that we would experience our Father’s love to the point where it overflows from us – then we will begin to treat people as Jesus would have.

    So, why not have lunch with these people and ask that we learn to act in God’s love, even if we don’t agree with their lifestyle. At least then there could be dialogue and a common recognition of humanity, even if we still disagree.

  2. If we carry Christ’s love, then it is simply our job to love and accept them for who they are. If we simply live in love, God naturally expels all fear and brings those that are close to us to Himself, just as Christ did.

    Love the unloved.

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