The Most Successful Preacher Today…

Many of you will know this man – an inspiration to preachers everywhere:

Is this the Holy Spirit at work? Or the Toronto anointing? You’ve got to watch it to the end – the message is just what we are used to!

And the company is very prosperous – a sure sign of God’s blessing! He’s even inspired a viral hit single – is this Hillsong territory?:

(I particularly liked the comment from aaronjacob25 on the youtube site: ‘deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant deodorant .”)

In case anyone is confused, the man in the videos is not actually a famous preacher. He is Steve Ballmer, the CEO of Microsoft, and the videos are from 4 years ago.

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RavingPente


13 thoughts on “The Most Successful Preacher Today…

  1. I loved that video since I saw it the first time. I’m a proud heretic regarding their One (and only) Microsoft Way (that’s really their campus address in Redmond) so I was well inoculated against Steves rubbish.

    But regarding his “anointing”. Steve is jewish, so likely the Spirit of the Lord may really have made him dance like King David.

  2. I must be a heretic too because I wrote the post on a Mac, and my husband only uses ubuntu.

    But it is amaaaazing how similar Steve is to many preachers we are used to!

  3. I saw this dances a few years ago. Simply soaking in the glory of man and the stage. He made it!

    Yep. Hillsong influence. 🙂

  4. Interesting comparison to preachers.

    I guess people are built to like enthusiasm. It has an emotional effect on us if someone looks like theyre extremely excited about something. We’re likely to assume that there is something to be excited about, even if we cant see it intellectually.

    Salesmen (including people like Ballmer) instinctively know this and play up the enthusiasm – in order to attract people and get them to be customers, employees or investors. In Ballmer’s case you can see its not his natural personality – he’s forcing himself to fake it. Even his body movements look stiff, as if he hasnt danced for about 20 years.

    A wise investor, customer or employee would disregard the emotional effect this has on them. They would analyse the facts and then make a decision. Others like the Microsoft or Apple fan-boys have made their decision and need events like this to keep the enthusiasm going. They need the constant reassurance that they have made the right decision and the feeling that there is something more new and exciting just around the corner.

    In other words, not like the contemporary church at all.

  5. “Others like the Microsoft or Apple fan-boys have made their decision and need events like this to keep the enthusiasm going. They need the constant reassurance that they have made the right decision and the feeling that there is something more new and exciting just around the corner.

    In other words, not like the contemporary church at all.”

    Um… Hillsong is still changing the world, bringing people into the kingdom and transforming millions lives. They are producing worship songs that are affecting the global church and being influential and bringing cities to know God. They are contemporary, relevant and life-changing. They are a move of God like no other.

    This is the mindset that they pump. I would say that is very similar to how you said Microsoft works. No?

  6. S&P – Wazza was being sarcastic!

    I’ve been to a few investment seminars too, which are very similar in style. One of them, I remember, brought the speaker on to the same intro music as you can hear in the first Ballmer video – ‘Get on your feet’ by Gloria Estefan. That was pretty popular at motivational events to rev the crowd up into a good mood. Just the same as a megachurch, but ‘secular’.

    The seminars I went to were pretty good when they were purely aimed at educating people. Later, they evolved to selling product (investments) on top of the education. At that point, the education side became more secondary, and basically you couldn’t learn as much if you were a DIY person. I think church institutions can follow a similar path, when they lose their focus on quality teaching and equipping, and start to sell their brand or focus very pointedly on raising funds.

  7. Yeah trying to do sarcasm, risky on an internet forum.

    I worked for a short while at an IT software vendor. The Sales staff were a breed apart from the technical staff (or anyone else I had met previously). Things were said such as “I don’t know if its true, but its a good story to tell anyway” and “Don’t confuse sales with delivery”

    In other words they became totally involved with the social realities, and divorced from the actual realities of the things they were selling.

    This is also a problem for churches especially when they focus on things like “decisions for Jesus”, memberships or such, which are social realities.

  8. I’ve worked in an IT company and seen what you talk about too, wazza, re sales staff selling things that don’t exist yet to clients who don’t know that. The motivation to get the sale is stronger than the motivation to be completely real about the product. They aren’t always too keen to know what the technical guys can actually deliver, and then someone more technical than the sales staff has to go in to bridge the gap between the technical possibilities and the client’s expectations.

    An interesting analogy with ‘sales’ from a church perspective.

  9. I work with a few salesmen who happen to be christians. They tend to be evangelistic in gifting. Their personalities tend to be emotional and empathetic and connect well socially. They also operate the best when they are pumped full of optimism. Which, unchecked, creates some of the problems mentioned.

    As with all of us, their strengths are also their weaknesses. Their desire is to get people to sign on the dotted line, not to get lost on the technical or theological detail.

    However, too many IT people aren’t good for a business either. Are IT people generally teachers by gifting? Do we need teachers to tidy up the mess that evangelists make in the same way technical people tidy up after sales people?

    What would technical people have to do if there weren’t any salespeople?

  10. It’s not that IT people don’t need sales people; it’s just a lot easier for everyone if the salespeople really do understand what they are selling! In some businesses this is no easy task, but it really does help everyone. I’ve worked with some IT people that couldn’t connect with clients and had no empathy for them at all. There are others though that can work with sales people. The best relationships I saw were when the IT people and the sales people were honest enough and respectful enough of one another to engender trust when working together. Perhaps that is what works well in a church environment as well – when people respect one another enough to allow each to operate in their giftings yet to listen to each other’s input so their own is improved. So an evangelist might benefit from a strong relationship with a teacher, and vice versa. The people who listen to them then benefit from the combination. Trust allows safety when discussing any issues that come up. Egos aren’t needed.

  11. So just as we see businesses where this works well or badly, likewise with churches. Attitudes are a key, including diligence, trust and respect.

  12. I totally agree RP, its interesting how people are organised and led so that individuals grow and their personalities combine rather than clash. It is the same in both business and church.

    Same problems and the same benefits. Egos have to go otherwise the dominant egos become duplicated too much and the organisation becomes unbalanced.

    We seem to need each other and need to help one another but battle against this for selfish reasons.
    I wonder if there is a business book about serving your way to the top or serving your way to the bottom!

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