I’ll take the chocolate, but you can keep Easter

Broken chocolate eggHaving  a great affection for chocolate, I’ll take it in any form offered.

This being the season of chocolate gifts in the shape of eggs doesn’t deter me from the enjoyment of the delicacy. It’s the taste, not the shape, that counts. All things are lawful to the righteous man.

I say this because Easter, as it is called, isn’t really a Christian festival, but, like many pagan celebrations, has been adapted into the Christian calendar, and, sadly, fully adopted by the faithful.

The King James Version of the Bible even mentions Easter, such is the longevity of the association with this season, in connection with the death and resurrection of Christ. This, of course, is a gross mistranslation of the word pascha, at Acts 14:2. Pascha is from the Aramaic, and actually refers to the Passover, the premier Jewish feast which remembers the escape from captivity of Israel, and looks forward to the coming Messiah as deliverer.

Strongs translates pascha:

1) the paschal sacrifice (which was accustomed to be offered for the people’s deliverance of old from Egypt)

2) the paschal lamb, i.e. the lamb the Israelites were accustomed to slay and eat on the fourteenth day of the month of Nisan (the first month of their year) in memory of the day on which their fathers, preparing to depart from Egypt, were bidden by God to slay and eat a lamb, and to sprinkle their door posts with its blood, that the destroying angel, seeing the blood, might pass over their dwellings; Christ crucified is likened to the slain paschal lamb

3) the paschal supper

4) the paschal feast, the feast of the Passover, extending from the 14th to the 20th day of the month Nisan

Strongs doesn’t mention what Easter refers to, or how it came to be placed in the AV as a translation of pascha. He just translates pascha as it should be without reference to the error, but others do tell us what the error is all about.

W. E. Vines, in his Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words, says, of pascha:

‘…mistranslated “Easter” in Acts 12:4, AV, denotes the Passover (RV). The phrase “after the Passover” signifies after the whole festival was at an end.

The term “Easter” is not of Christian origin. It is another form of Astarte, one of the titles of the Chaldean goddess, the queen of heaven.

The festival of Pasch held by Christians in post-apostolic times was a continuation of the Jewish feast, but was not instituted by Christ, nor was it connected with Lent. From this Pasch the pagan festival of “Easter” was quite distinct and was introduced into the apostate Western religion, as part of the attempt to adapt pagan festivals to Christianity. See PASSOVER.’

Vines goes on to tell us that pascha is ‘the Greek spelling of the Aramaic word for the Passover, from the Hebrew pasach, “to pass over, to spare,” a feast instituted by God in commemoration of the deliverance of Israel from Egypt, and anticipatory of the expiatory sacrifice of Christ’.

The New King James Version, NIV and Green’s Literal Translation all have ‘Passover’ in place of ‘Easter’.

Of course, pascha has nothing whatsoever to do with chocolate, bunnies, eggs, fertility rights, or, more significantly, Easter. As Vines points out, Easter is a corruption of the name of Astarte, the Chaldean goddess, Queen of Heaven, and the fertility rites associated with the coming of Spring.

Creepy deals crawl in
Easter, despite its pagan roots and association with the false goddess, had, through a mixture of religion, stealth and spiritual blindness, crept into the calendar of the early church, and, by the time of the Council of Nicaea, was already a part of the festival, although, up until this time it had been associated with the Jewish callendar, and celebrated according to dates of the Jewish Passover. However, this was changed by Constantine’s decree at Nicaea, and a fixed time was arranged.

“At the council we also considered the issue of our holiest day, Easter, and it was determined by common consent that everyone, everywhere should celebrate it on one and the same day. For what can be more appropriate, or what more solemn, than that this feast from which we have received the hope of immortality, should be kept by all without variation, using the same order and a clear arrangement? And in the first place, it seemed very unworthy for us to keep this most sacred feast following the custom of the Jews, a people who have soiled their hands in a most terrible outrage, and have thus polluted their souls, and are now deservedly blind. Since we have cast aside their way of calculating the date of the festival, we can ensure that future generations can celebrate this observance at the more accurate time which we have kept from the first day of the passion until the present time….”— Emperor Constantine, following the Council of Nicaea

Already, then, we have the error of Easter well implanted into the calendar, even given legitimacy by a council originally called to deal with the Arian controversy. It even changed times and seasons to suit the pagan fertility rites of Astarte worship, which is, most years, not even coinciding with the true date of the Passover. And Constantine even blamed the Jews for the demise of the old dates.

Correction: The word Easter was translated so from Socrates’ account, although he used the word Pascha. It is not evident what word Constantine used, but the date change remains the same. According to Adam Clarke, the translation of Easter into the Anglo-Saxon prayer book led to the inclusion in the AV. It remains a reference to the goddess Easter, also know as Ishtar or Astarte. The translation Easter remains curiously English, and is thought to be derived from the Druidic worship of pre-Christian times. It is also known that the early English Christians celebrated Pascha, but were forced by Rome to change the time of their celebration, which coincided with the Jewish Passover, to celebrate Easter [Ed]*.

Astarte, Queen of Heaven, reviled by God in Jeremiah 44 as a false deity, the goddess of fertility, to whom Israel illegitimately bowed down and baked tarts (short form of astarte), burned incense, and poured out drink offerings, brought forward into the Christian calendar, with the associated symbolism of fertility rites, was being worshipped despite the associated hat-tip to the death and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ.

And the chocolate? Well someone came up with the idea of eggs and rabbits moulded in chocolate, symbols already very much in vogue amongst Christians, straight out of the Roman Catholic stream of paganism mingled with a religious form of Christianity.

Hammer and nailThe true Feast
I am glad the true feast can still be celebrated, that of the Pasche, the Passion of Christ, who died once for the whole world, so all could come to Him and be delivered from their sin, including their idolatry, their paganism, secularism, humanism and any other system which denies or contradicts the One True God.

I am glad that Christ has made us free from the law of sin and death, and given us the new life God intended for us. His sacrifice at the cross opened the way for us to be saved, healed, delivered and released from all bondage to sin, death, and any need of worship of other gods, goddesses, saints, systems, men or women. Our reliance is on God alone, and in Him do we trust, none other.

And the way to Him is through faith, by His grace, alone. No works, no struggle, no penance, no boasting, no pain, no payment, no rules, no law, only faith in Him and in the work of His cross, the price paid, once and for all.

So send me chocolate. I’ll smash it, and eat it as chocolate, removing the symbolism, because I can, but please don’t ask me to celebrate the pagan Queen of Heaven’s feasts. She’s a fake and a fraud, as are those who installed her in their religious systems.

I’ll take the Passion of Christ, the Passover, the Paschal Lamb, the reality of Christ’s sacrifice and our gain of new life.

Give me truth, that’s all!

Posted by Steve
*Thanks to Bones for research which led to corrections


62 thoughts on “I’ll take the chocolate, but you can keep Easter

  1. Steve, symbols only have the meanng that we give to them. See how the Swastika is now a symbol of hate. It was not always so.

    I have a gnome in my front garden. It’s a statue that looks nice. If I start worshiping it then it becomes something else – an idol.

    I have a cross on my wall. To some it’s a nice piece of decor. To me it reminds me that Jesus died for me. It’s the meaning I give to it. So you could receive an Easter Egg and think crap a pagan (like JWs), or yummy chocolate in the shape of an egg or eggs symbolise new life, resurrection. I choose the latter.

    Sunday is the day dedicated to the Sun god, Saturday – Saturn and so on. Do you and I worship those gods on those days? – no.

    This article pretty much sums up the origins of Easter.

    As everyone knows, it’s that time of year when we celebrate the religious festival dedicated to St. Easter, the patron saint of chocaholics. Wait, no, that can’t be right… Ummmm.

    In fact, Easter is just one of many confusingly indistinct holidays that blend weird paganism, Christian theology, and modern marketing into a seamless melange of oddly abutting practices and customs. Christmas and Halloween are equally strange, and are growing in popularity despite an increasingly secular world, so how much of Easter really is Christian in origin? It may be more than you realise.

    Easter is, of course, an extremely reverential period for Christians around the world, as they commemorate the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and his resurrection. But the nomenclature of the festival is entirely pagan, and has nothing to do with Christianity whatsoever. It is generally agreed by historians that Eostre was a pagan goddess in the Saxon religion, possibly associated with the dawn and the bringing of light. Put simply, she was the harbinger of spring after the long cold winter. As harbingers go, she was way more popular than Doom and Sorrow, who were total and utter berks that nobody liked… not even their mums.

    Pagan beliefs are hard to identify clearly in the historical record, but we know of Eostre thanks to the Venerable Bede, a brilliant monastic scholar who documented the transition from paganism to Christianity in Dark Ages England. He was pretty vague on how Eostre was celebrated by the Saxons, but it seems to have been a fertility rite. This would make sense, what with all the lambs being born, and flowers blooming… Of course, the story of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection fitted rather snugly into the pagan model of death (winter) followed by rebirth (spring), meaning the Church could effectively bolt the former onto the latter without angering too many heavily-armed bearded warriors.

    Superimposing Christian rites onto pagan traditions was hugely successful for the Church, as you will notice by the dating of Christmas to the same week as Roman Saturnalia, but the consequence was a certain fuzziness in how people behaved. Historians dub it ‘syncretism’, while cynics prefer ‘hedging your bets’. In any case, early medieval Christians clung onto some quirkily pagan habits. My favourite is this ‘spell’ for fertile crops…

    1) At night, dig up four clumps of soil from the four corners of the field
    2) Then take a sample of every grass, herb, tree in the field, and add it to milk from every cow, and honey from every bee hive.
    3) Now add holy water to this concoction, and drip it in the holes…
    4) Now sing an incantation, asking them to grow.
    5) Now sing the Lord’s Prayer, several times
    6) Now take the four clumps of earth into the church, and get your local priest to sing four masses… one for each clump
    7) Now get four crucifixes and write Matthew, Mark, Luke and John on them. Place the crucifixes in the holes you have dug, and shout ‘Grow!’ nine times
    8) Now sing the Lord’s Prayer nine times
    9) Now turn east, bow and say a prayer
    10) Now turn around clockwise three times, and then lie prostrate on the ground while chanting about your lovely green fields
    11) Now bless the plough and bless the seed
    12) Now plough a furrow, and place a cake of honey and milk in it.
    13) Well done, you now have a fertile field!

    This enormously elaborate ritual has all the hallmarks of a pagan fertility rite, except with the not-very-subtle substitution of pagan gods for the Gospel-writers. It’s as if farmers just clicked ‘Find & Replace’ on their laptops and figured God probably wouldn’t care. It seems that a relatively lax attitude by parish priests meant that switching from paganism to Catholicism was the equivalent of changing your electricity provider – a bit of a nuisance, but ultimately you could still power the dishwasher.

    However, the switchover was not as simple as that at an institutional level. For starters, the wider Christian Church was in total in disarray over when Easter should be observed. In the early 2nd Century, there were some who celebrated it on the Jewish festival of Passover, on the 14th day of the moon. This had the habit of landing on random days of the week, which didn’t seem suitably sacred. Apparently, Tuesdays just didn’t cut it when it came to miracles… (Incidentally, our days of the week are still named after pagan gods – Mona, Tiw, Woden, Thunor, Freya, Saturn, Sunne) Soon after, Syriac Christians suggested Easter should fall on the Sunday after Passover. In 325AD, the Council of Nicaea decided to enforce this worldwide… unfortunately, they had not counted on Britain failing dismally to tow the European line (sound familiar?)

    When St Augustine arrived in Canterbury in 597AD, having been sent to convert this pagan isle to Christianity on the back of a terrible pun from the Pope (“not Angles but Angels!”), he discovered the Irish Church had decided on its own dating of Easter. The confusion reigned for another 70 years, with one famous Saxon victim being Queen Eanflaed who was forced to watch her hubby, King Osway, stuff his face at an Easter banquet while she was still fasting during Lent. It seems the King and Queen were on separate calendars – she Roman, and he Irish. The Roman calendar finally won out in 664AD at the Synod of Whitby. Today Whitby is known for its excellent fish and chips, and a weird legend about Dracula… I’m not sure if they are connected but it seems unlikely.

    So, do we today celebrate Easter on that day declared by the Council of Nicaea? Nope! Yet more tinkering, this time in the late 16th century, saw Western Europe switch to the Gregorian Calendar instead of the Julian Calendar. So, now West and East were on different systems again… except, typically, Britain once again caused confusion by refusing to jump to the Gregorian system until 150 years later, when it found itself having to drop 12 days from September to catch up… meaning September 2nd was followed by the 14th. Sigh. In short, this now means that Easter can fall on one of 35 days, and the computation has become more complicated than trying to assemble an Ikea space-station.

    To add yet more chaos into the mix, Easter has now become synonymous with chocolate eggs and rabbits. On the face of it, this seems as logical as declaring Christmas the yoghurt festival, and having Santa’s sled pulled by newts. Yet, there is a curious obviousness to both of these interlopers.

    Rabbits are often said to be fecund little critters, frequently noted to be shagging like… well, rabbits. Oddly, this extraordinary sexual fertility was interpreted in ancient science as the exact opposite – goodness knows why, but it was thought that rabbits and hares were hermaphrodites who could impregnate themselves. This gave them a slightly weird association with virginity, which the Christian Church soon picked up on. Surprisingly for such rampant humpers, hares and rabbits became animal ciphers for the Virgin Mary in medieval Christian art. Of course, to the slightly backwards Saxon syncretists who were still prostrating themselves on their fields and chanting gibberish to their crops, animals noted for their constant reproduction made perfect sense for an Easter fertility association.

    Eggs, in theory, have nowt to do with Jesus. He didn’t have to climb out of one, like in that weird bit in The Matrix. Yet, in the Greek Church it is said Mary Magdalene brought boiled eggs to the tomb of Jesus, to feed the other mourners, and when the tomb was found to be open the eggs miraculously turned blood red. A second story states Mary was proclaiming the resurrection to Pontius Pilate when his eggs also turned red, upon his refusal to believe her. These stories may be apocryphal, but they carry a weight that has lasted through history. The tradition of egg-painting, particularly in the colour red, is still very common in Eastern and Central Europe – and there are charming ceremonies where baskets of eggs are blessed by the priests.

    You may be wondering where does the egg-eating come into it? Well, in the medieval era eggs were considered to be dairy products (they were derived from animals without causing harm or the spilling of blood) so they were banned for Lent. This gave them a tinge of luxury when the 40 days of fasting was over… people were eager to eat them again. Don’t worry, I’ll refrain from making a terrible egg-citement pun. Oh, crap. Sorry.

    Of course, as always, eggs are the most blindingly obvious symbol of fertility and neatly tie into the pagan Eostre. It is easy to forget in this age of battery chickens that medieval hens only laid from spring to autumn – the Saxons would have had every right to associate Easter with the arrival of eggs. Indeed, to this day there are still curious local Easter traditions such as egg-rolling (where eggs are rolled down hills) and egg-tapping (basically a game of conkers, but with hard-boiled eggs). It’s hard to know how ancient these are, but they are certainly pre-date the modern age.

    In the 19th Century, Father Christmas evolved into Santa Claus with the express purpose of educating children about divine morality – if you’re good, you get a reward. He’s basically a training-wheels version of God for kids too young to comprehend an invisible deity. In the 17th Century, a similar thing seems to have happened in Germany with the Easter Bunny. This anthropomorphic personification appears to be almost entirely pagan in concept (it’s also really, really weird – a mammal that lays eggs? They should have called it the Easter Platypus…) However, the Easter Bunny (actually, it’s a hare in Germany) rewarded only the well-behaved boys and girls, teaching them to be moral and Christian. It became popular worldwide once it was taken to America and spread outside of the German communities of Pennsylvania.

    Of course, modern Britain is becoming increasingly secular and many of the religious overtones of Easter are being forgotten. Ironically, it seems to be returning to a springtime fertility festival, where we eat roast lamb and spread daffodils around the house. Yet the Christian elements are very much there, even if they seem to be entirely nonsensical upon first glance.

    So, in short, Easter has continued its relevance for more than two millennia, and thanks to the invention of chocolate, it doesn’t look likely to vanish anytime soon. As an unashamed chocolate fiend, I for one am very glad…

    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/greg-jenner/easter-whats-with-all-the-bunnies_b_1406355.html

  2. Thanks, Bones, that’s very interesting, and conjures up some interesting pictures to go along with the other iconic displays of Ashteroth worship.

    Like the Virgin Mary Bunny handing out boiled eggs at Jesus’ tomb! 😀

    Oh well, they hadn’t invented chocolate in Israel yet, had they?

    Isn’t it amazing how Mary just keeps on bouncing up in these tales!

    He gets it almost right when he says, ‘Eggs, in theory, have nowt to do with Jesus’. Indeed! But only in theory? I’m sure he must have eaten eggs, because he talks about the cock crowing three times, so there must have been hens around, and therefore eggs, but as a symbol of new life? Hmmm!

    The egg imagery comes from pagan beliefs of the rise of Semiramis, who is said, mimicking, as the Dark Mysteries do, the story of Moses, to have floated down a holy river in an egg-shaped craft, before landing and bursting forth from the egg like some stripper at a Labour Party conference, and was also pictured with multiple breasts to feed her many offspring, the beginner of multitasking perhaps, or the first milk-machine, but maybe we shouldn’t spoil a good story with tales of false goddesses.

    There is no connection between the Passover and fertility rites. The Passover was in remembrance of God’s deliverance of Israel form the destroying angel who took out the entire first-born of Egypt, and is a type of God’s deliverance of mankind through the cross and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ.

    The new birth has nothing to do with fertility. It is God reconciling men to Himself through the death and resurrection of His Son.

    The woman, or mediatrix, has nothing to do with it, and is a perversion, whether we add sentimentality to the tales or not, by referencing little bunny rabbits, eggs, giving, being good or having fun, to excuse a pagan rite by shifting iconic imagery in front of it, the fact remains that the mystery behind the festival is an abomination.

    I think some legends are best left to fade into obscurity.

    Passover peace to you and yours!

  3. From a German point of view – where the Bunny came from.

    Having lived in Germany for most of my childhood “Happy Easter!” is “Frohe Ostern!” “Ostern” literally means “Eastern” or “towards the East.” Liturgically we look towards the East where the Sun rises for the “Son Rise.” This is both a backwards look to the historical Resurrection and a forward look to the Second Coming of Christ which heralds the General Resurrection of all humanity. Chicks and ducklings emerging from their eggs are a visual symbol of Christ emerging from the tomb as are rabbits emerging from their underground warrens. The “Osterhase” or “Easter Bunny” with his basket of eggs is symbolic of Christ bringing us new life. Our secular culture, the candy companies and the card companies have reduced these rich Christian symbols into cutesy commercial icons.

    Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/blog/jimmy-akin/is-easter-pagan#ixzz1rVHA8sNn

  4. In all your insane pagan influence type conspiracy theories you’ve adopted from Hislop, not once have you described HOW these pagan influences came to be borne in the Christian Church.

    Like your nonsense about egg-shaped craft.

    It’s simply a matter of pagans used eggs, Easter has eggs, Easter is pagan. It’s a false use of logic.

    Like atheists use to compare the Virgin Birth, miracles and resurrection of Jesus with other gods like Attis who have very similar accounts.

    Attis worship predated Christianity by centuries and existed in the Mediterranean. He was born of a virgin, referred to as a shepherd, was crucified to a tree and miraculously came to life three days later, bringing salvation with him.

    Sound familiar.

    Don’t you love conspiracy theories?

  5. There is nothing insane about what I am saying.

    I didn’t quote anything from Hislop. My comment on the egg was obviously tongue in cheek, but probably not far off. I think it was actually more likely to be a again belief that it was Bacchus coming out of the egg, but the multiple breasts are known to be a symbol of the goddess, for sure. I’ll research it for you!

    However, my quip is clearly not as unreasonable as claiming Mary as a virgin bunny giving boiled eggs to mourners as a sound reason for having Easter and eggs!

    And where do you say the fertility symbolism is derived?

    On Astarte, I actually referenced what W. E. Vines said about the translation of Easter at Acts 14.2. Please read the post again.

    Vines was the one in the post who said it was a pagan reference to Astarte.

    That fact actually isn’t in dispute amongst theologians.

    The reference to bunnies and eggs, however, has nothing whatsoever to do with the death and resurrection of Christ.

    You just can’t admit that fact.

    That I find strange. I won’t go as far as you as to claim it is insane, but can you say it is in any way logical or even reasonable?

  6. Chicks and ducklings emerging from their eggs are a visual symbol of Christ emerging from the tomb as are rabbits emerging from their underground warrens.

    You’re kidding, right?

    Why not research the ‘mundane egg’, also called the ‘world egg’ or ‘cosmic egg’? Do Brahmanda, Ogdoad, or Pangu mean anything to you?

  7. Do Brahmanda, Ogdoad, or Pangu mean anything to you?

    No. Should they? Does Attis mean anything to you? Seems you spend a lot of time witch hunting.

    Most Pentecostal churches have drums in their worship – in fact it is essential to get young people aroused. They are not Biblical – they aren’t a timbrel. Yet they sure as heck are used in satanic and voodoo rituals.

    You’d better research the satanic and pagan use of drums which you advocate in your church. I won’t hold my breath though.

    DRUM – TOPHET
    The drum is a percussion instrument, known in various forms and played throughout the world and throughout history. Essentially a drum is a frame over which one or more membranes or skins are stretched. The frame is usually cylindrical or conical, but it comes in many other shapes. It was known since the beginning of time, nevertheless it is not found in the Bible as an instrument in the worship of God. However, we see plenty of it in the satanic worship with the name of Tophet, the same as Topheth; from Hebrew: toph, “a drum,” because the cries of children here sacrificed by the priests of Moloch were drowned by the noise of such an instrument. Moloch was the god of the Ammonites, portrayed as a bronze statue with a calf’s head adorned with a royal crown and seated on a throne. His arms were extended to receive the child victims sacrificed to him. Moloch was a frightening and terrible demon covered with mothers’ tears and children’s blood. When a child was sacrificed to Moloch, a fire was lit inside the statue. The priests would then beat loudly on drums & other objects so that the cries of the roasted baby would not be heard. Such was the use of the Drums.

    The large frame drums were never used in the worship of God, the nearest thing resembling a drum was the Timbrel or Tabret similar to a tambourine but these were hand held making light sounds, not fracas.

    DRUMMING UP DEMONS
    Extracts from Bible Guidelines for Music with many secular quotes; (by Terry Watkins)

    The Bible lists many kinds of instruments (Psalms 150:3-5), yet one instrument is NEVER mentioned! The drum was a very common instrument in Egypt and the lands around Israel. Did the Lord just forget to include the DRUM or is there another reason? Is it because drums are associated with voodoo, shamanism, paganism and magic rituals?

    Drums are “played to summon up magic powers” (The Illustrated Book of Signs & Symbols)… and are “used in shamanic rituals to heal people. It is believed that the shaman can communicate with the spirit world THROUGH DRUMMING.” (Musical Instruments). “Pagan dances and rituals are always accompanied by the incessant BEAT of DRUMS.” (Satan’s Music Exposed)

    Robert Palmer, contributing editor to Rolling Stone… advocate and lover of rock music, writes, in Rock & Roll An Unruly History: “Bata drums [drums used in voodoo], sacred to the Yoruba people of Nigeria and Cuba… provided a template for the inner rhythms of rock and roll… serve as conduits for spiritual energies, linking individual human consciousness with the gods… the drum rhythms that make rock and roll can ultimately be traced back to African music of a primarily spiritual or ritual nature. In a sense, rock and roll is a kind of ‘voodoo’… Drums are used in “voodoo” possession… drummers tap out their rhythm patterns like signals to the realm of the gods, inviting and enticing them to come and POSSESS their devotees.”

    Little Richard, the self-professed “architect of rock ‘n roll”, readily admits Satan’s control and influence in his life and rock music: “My true belief about Rock ‘n’ Roll – is this: “I believe this kind of music is demonic…. A lot of the BEATS in music today are taken from voodoo, from the voodoo DRUMS.” (The Life and Times of Little Richard)

    “The shaman was the original ‘long hair’, the first rock star draped in leather, dancing possessed to a rhythm banged out on a DRUM… communication with the gods was synonymous with DRUMS… the body can become the conduit for a deity… DRUMS are the catalyst for the whole process… what Westerners simplistically call ‘possession’.” (Appetite for Destruction)

    David Tame writes in The Secret Power of Music: “Today’s DRUMMER differs but little from the shaman in his incessant beating out of a rhythm, and likewise often enters into a form of trance while performing.”

    The DRUM has always been associated with paganism and the devil… When the first blacks from Africa were converted to Christianity they knew the power and evil influence of DRUMS. And the converted blacks strictly forbid the use of drums! They referred to the drums as “the Devil’s drum”. (Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music)>

    It really does look like that the one simple guideline for Christian music is: NO DRUMS!

    Drums, although in wide use and well known in all history were never used to worship God because drums have always been associated with voodoo, shamanism, paganism and magic rituals, the church of Christ has no part with that.

    http://www.albatrus.org/english/church-order/worship/drums_suitable_worship_god.htm

  8. We were talking about eggs, Bones, not drums. Now if you want to start a post on drums I’d be delighted to engage in a discussion.

    However, on eggs, it would help you to research the ‘mundane egg’, also called the ‘world egg, or ‘cosmic egg’. It will give you information on the again understanding of what it means for an egg to be hatched as part of the mysteries.

    Even wikipedia has some information which gives a bit of a hint.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_egg

    Still, if you prefer to change the subject rather than see what I’m saying, fair enough.

  9. By the way, how on earth is searching for truth a witch-hunt?

    You mean you’d rather stick to your egg and bunny stories than the true meaning of the death and resurrection of Christ?

    And you’d rather your catholic friends be left to worship a false goddess and do penance to miss purgatory than warn them that it is not Biblical to do so?

    Are you calling ignorance bliss?

  10. Yep read it, means bugger all. My chocolate eggs went down well with my chocolate bunny.

    I quite like the drums thing though. Definite pagan and satanic influence if you were looking for conspiracy theories.

    What do you think of the similarities between Attis and Jesus of Nazareth oh pagan witch hunter?

    Just a coincidence?

  11. By the way, how on earth is searching for truth a witch-hunt?

    You aren’t searching for truth. You are looking for bits of enticing information that fit with your world view that traditional Christianity is pagan whereas yours isn’t.

    The atheists make a more compelling case that the Gospels are contrived from paganism than your constant nonsense.

  12. Where did you get this article? There is a fundamental linguistic flaw to this argument.

    Just about this quote from Constantine

    “At the council we also considered the issue of our holiest day, Easter,

    Did Constantine speak or write in Old English?

    I’m pretty sure that Constantine’s words would have been in Latin/ Greek which would have been

    “At the council we also considered the issue of our holiest day, At the council we also considered the issue of our holiest day, Pascha…”

    Easter is the English translation.

    So much for the creepy deal.

  13. Yes, Margot, I’m aware it’s nonsense and I’ve debated atheists who believe it.

    But I’m not the one advocating mass Christian paganism (or is that pagan Christianity).

  14. Í like the bit that James White says about Christians rejecting paganism such as proclaiming Caeser as Lord and it cost them their lives.

    These were the same Christians who Steve would believe as embracing paganism.

  15. Actually there are other inaccuracies in that leading article. Poor old Constantine is the bad guy again.

    So Constantine would have used the term Pascha (Latin) not Eastre (a word only in use in Old English and unknown untll the 8th Century – thanks Bede).

    Did Constantine change the time of Pascha?

    Not so. In fact different churches celebrated Pascha on different dates. Some wanted it on Passover, some on the Sunday following. Then it was alleged that the Jews had been incorrectly setting the date of Passover.

    But the anyone searching for truth would know that.

    By the later 2nd century, it was accepted that the celebration of Pascha (Easter) was a practice of the disciples and an undisputed tradition. The Quartodeciman controversy, the first of several Paschal/Easter controversies, then arose concerning the date on which Pascha should be celebrated.

    The term “Quartodeciman” refers to the practice of celebrating Pascha or Easter on Nisan 14 of the Hebrew calendar, “the LORD’s passover” (Leviticus 23:5 (http://bibref.hebtools.com/?book=%20Leviticus&verse=23:5&src=!) ). According to the church historian Eusebius, the Quartodeciman Polycarp (bishop of Smyrna, by tradition a disciple of John the Evangelist) debated the question with Anicetus (bishop of Rome). The Roman province of Asia was Quartodeciman, while the Roman and Alexandrian churches continued the fast until the Sunday following, wishing to associate Easter with Sunday. Neither Polycarp nor Anicetus persuaded the other, but they did not consider the matter schismatic either, parting in peace and leaving the question unsettled.

    By the later 3rd century, however, some Christians began to express dissatisfaction with the custom of relying on the Jewish community to determine the date of Easter. The chief complaint was that the Jewish communities sometimes erred in setting Passover to fall before the northern hemisphere spring equinox. Anatolius of Laodicea in the later 3rd century wrote:

    Those who place [the first lunar month of the year] in [the twelfth zodiacal sign before the spring equinox] and fix the Paschal fourteenth day accordingly, make a great and indeed an extraordinary mistake[47]

    Peter, bishop of Alexandria (died 312), had a similar complaint

    On the fourteenth day of [the month], being accurately observed after the equinox, the ancients celebrated the Passover, according to the divine command. Whereas the men of the present day now celebrate it before the equinox, and that altogether through negligence and error.[48]

    The Sardica paschal table[49] confirms these complaints, for it indicates that the Jews of some eastern Mediterranean city (possibly Antioch) fixed Nisan 14 on 11 March (Julian) in AD 328, on 5 March in AD 334, on 2 March in AD 337, and on 10 March in AD 339, all well before the spring equinox.[50]

    Because of this dissatisfaction with reliance on the Jewish calendar, some Christians began to experiment with independent computations.[51]

    Two other objections that some Christians may have had to maintaining the custom of consulting the Jewish community in order to determine Easter are implied in Constantine’s letter from the Council of Nicea to the absent bishops:

    It appeared an unworthy thing that in the celebration of this most holy feast we should follow the practice of the Jews…For we have it in our power, if we abandon their custom, to prolong the due observance of this ordinance to future ages by a truer order…For their boast is absurd indeed, that it is not in our power without instruction from them to observe these things….Being altogether ignorant of the true adjustment of this question, they sometimes celebrate Passover twice in the same year.[53]

    The reference to Passover twice in the same year might refer to the geographical diversity that existed at that time in the Jewish calendar, due in large measure to the breakdown of communications in the Empire. Jews in one city might determine Passover differently from Jews in another city.[54] The reference to the Jewish “boast”, and, indeed, the strident anti-Jewish tone of the whole passage, suggests another issue: some Christians thought that it was undignified for Christians to depend on Jews to set the date of a Christian festival.

    This controversy between those who advocated independent computations, and those who wished to continue the custom of relying on the Jewish calendar, was formally resolved by the First Council of Nicaea in 325 (see below), which endorsed the move to independent computations, effectively requiring the abandonment of the old custom of consulting the Jewish community in those places where it was still used.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter

  16. Actually there are other inaccuracies in that leading article. Poor old Constantine is the bad guy again.

    So Constantine would have used the term Pascha (Latin) not Eastre (a word only in use in Old English and unknown untll the 8th Century – thanks Bede).

    Did Constantine change the time of Pascha?

    Not so. In fact different churches celebrated Pascha on different dates. Some wanted it on Passover, some on the Sunday following. Then it was alleged that the Jews had been incorrectly setting the date of Passover.

    But the anyone searching for truth would know that.

    By the later 2nd century, it was accepted that the celebration of Pascha (Easter) was a practice of the disciples and an undisputed tradition. The Quartodeciman controversy, the first of several Paschal/Easter controversies, then arose concerning the date on which Pascha should be celebrated.

    The term “Quartodeciman” refers to the practice of celebrating Pascha or Easter on Nisan 14 of the Hebrew calendar, “the LORD’s passover” (Leviticus 23:5). According to the church historian Eusebius, the Quartodeciman Polycarp (bishop of Smyrna, by tradition a disciple of John the Evangelist) debated the question with Anicetus (bishop of Rome). The Roman province of Asia was Quartodeciman, while the Roman and Alexandrian churches continued the fast until the Sunday following, wishing to associate Easter with Sunday. Neither Polycarp nor Anicetus persuaded the other, but they did not consider the matter schismatic either, parting in peace and leaving the question unsettled.

    By the later 3rd century, however, some Christians began to express dissatisfaction with the custom of relying on the Jewish community to determine the date of Easter. The chief complaint was that the Jewish communities sometimes erred in setting Passover to fall before the northern hemisphere spring equinox. Anatolius of Laodicea in the later 3rd century wrote:

    Those who place [the first lunar month of the year] in [the twelfth zodiacal sign before the spring equinox] and fix the Paschal fourteenth day accordingly, make a great and indeed an extraordinary mistake[47]

    Peter, bishop of Alexandria (died 312), had a similar complaint

    On the fourteenth day of [the month], being accurately observed after the equinox, the ancients celebrated the Passover, according to the divine command. Whereas the men of the present day now celebrate it before the equinox, and that altogether through negligence and error.[48]

    The Sardica paschal table[49] confirms these complaints, for it indicates that the Jews of some eastern Mediterranean city (possibly Antioch) fixed Nisan 14 on 11 March (Julian) in AD 328, on 5 March in AD 334, on 2 March in AD 337, and on 10 March in AD 339, all well before the spring equinox.[50]

    Because of this dissatisfaction with reliance on the Jewish calendar, some Christians began to experiment with independent computations.[51]

    Two other objections that some Christians may have had to maintaining the custom of consulting the Jewish community in order to determine Easter are implied in Constantine’s letter from the Council of Nicea to the absent bishops:

    It appeared an unworthy thing that in the celebration of this most holy feast we should follow the practice of the Jews…For we have it in our power, if we abandon their custom, to prolong the due observance of this ordinance to future ages by a truer order…For their boast is absurd indeed, that it is not in our power without instruction from them to observe these things….Being altogether ignorant of the true adjustment of this question, they sometimes celebrate Passover twice in the same year.[53]

    The reference to Passover twice in the same year might refer to the geographical diversity that existed at that time in the Jewish calendar, due in large measure to the breakdown of communications in the Empire. Jews in one city might determine Passover differently from Jews in another city.[54] The reference to the Jewish “boast”, and, indeed, the strident anti-Jewish tone of the whole passage, suggests another issue: some Christians thought that it was undignified for Christians to depend on Jews to set the date of a Christian festival.

    This controversy between those who advocated independent computations, and those who wished to continue the custom of relying on the Jewish calendar, was formally resolved by the First Council of Nicaea in 325 (see below), which endorsed the move to independent computations, effectively requiring the abandonment of the old custom of consulting the Jewish community in those places where it was still used.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter

  17. Oh and on linguistic study most other languages use a variant of pascha.

    English is the only one that uses the term Eastre (Easter) which may have been named after Astarte.

    So the logical conclusion is that English speaking Christians are pagan.

    The Greek word Πάσχα and hence the Latin form Pascha is derived from Hebrew Pesach (פֶּסַח) meaning the festival of Passover. In Greek the word Ἀνάστασις Anástasis (upstanding, up-rising, resurrection) is used also as an alternative.

    Christians speaking Arabic or other Semitic languages generally use names cognate to Pesaḥ.

    In Ge’ez and the modern Ethiosemitic languages of Ethiopia and Eritrea, two forms exist: ፋሲካ (“Fasika”, fāsīkā) from Greek Pascha, and ትንሣኤ (“Tensae”, tinśā’ē), the latter from the Semitic root N-Ś-‘, meaning “to rise” (cf. Arabic nasha’a—ś merged with “sh” in Arabic and most non-South Semitic languages).

    In all Romance languages, the name of the Easter festival is derived from the Latin Pascha. In Spanish, Easter is Pascua, in Italian and Catalan Pasqua, in Portuguese Páscoa and in Romanian Paşti. In French, the name of Easter Pâques also derives from the Latin word but the s following the a has been lost and the two letters have been transformed into a â with a circumflex accent by elision. Additionally in Romanian, the only Romance language of an Eastern church, the word Înviere (resurrection, cf. Greek Ἀνάστασις, [anástasis]) is also used.

    In all Romance languages, the name of the Easter festival is derived from the Latin Pascha. In Spanish, Easter is Pascua, in Italian and Catalan Pasqua, in Portuguese Páscoa and in Romanian Paşti. In French, the name of Easter Pâques also derives from the Latin word but the s following the a has been lost and the two letters have been transformed into a â with a circumflex accent by elision. Additionally in Romanian, the only Romance language of an Eastern church, the word Înviere (resurrection, cf. Greek Ἀνάστασις, [anástasis]) is also used.

    In all modern Celtic languages the term for Easter is derived from Latin. In Brythonic languages this has yielded Welsh Pasg, Cornish and Breton Pask. In Goidelic languages the word was borrowed before these languages had re-developed the /p/ sound and as a result the initial /p/ was replaced with /k/. This yielded Irish Cáisc, Gaelic Càisg and Manx Caisht. These terms are normally used with the definite article in Goidelic languages, causing lenition in all cases: An Cháisc, A’ Chàisg and Y Chaisht.

    In Dutch, Easter is known as Pasen and in the Scandinavian languages Easter is known as påske (Danish and Norwegian), påsk (Swedish), páskar (Icelandic) and páskir (Faeroese). The name is derived directly from Hebrew Pesach.[24] The letter å is pronounced /oː/, derived from an older aa, and an alternate spelling is paaske or paask.

    Slavic languages

    In most Slavic languages, the name for Easter either means “Great Day” or “Great Night”. For example, Wielkanoc, Veľká noc, Velika noč and Velikonoce mean “Great Night” or “Great Nights” in Polish, Slovak, Slovenian and Czech, respectively. Велигден (Veligden), Великдень (Velykden), Великден (Velikden), and Вялікдзень (Vyalikdzyen’) mean “The Great Day” in Macedonian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, and Belarusian, respectively.

    In Croatian, however, the day’s name reflects a particular theological connection: it is called Uskrs, meaning “Resurrection”. It is also called Vazam (Vzem or Vuzem in Old Croatian), which is a noun that originated from the Old Church Slavonic verb vzeti (now uzeti in Croatian, meaning “to take”). In Serbian Easter is called Vaskrs, a liturgical form inherited from the Serbian recension of Church Slavonic, corresponding to Croatian Uskrs. The archaic term Velja noć (velmi: Old Slavic for “great”; noć: “night”) was used in Croatian while the term Velikden (“Great Day”) was used in Serbian. It should be noted that in these languages the prefix Velik (Great) is used in the names of the Holy Week and the three feast days preceding Easter.

    Another exception is Russian, in which the name of the feast, Пасха (Paskha), is a borrowing of the Greek form via Old Church Slavonic.[25]

    Finno-Ugric languages

    In Finnish the name for Easter pääsiäinen, traces back to the verb pääse- meaning to be released, as does the Sámi word Beassážat[citation needed]. The Estonian name lihavõtted and the Hungarian húsvét, however, literally mean the taking of the meat, relating to the end of the Great Lent fasting period

  18. Well, assuming Socrates is a reliable reference, the source is here:

    http://www.fourthcentury.com/urkunde-26/

    Which uses ‘W. Bright, Socrates’ ecclesiastical history, 2nd edition (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1893)’.

    You can check it at article 3, which was quoted exactly as I said in the post, thus:
    (3.) At the council we also considered the issue of our holiest day, Easter, and it was determined by common consent that everyone, everywhere should celebrate it on one and the same day.

    I think this merely confirms the depth of the infusion of this word into the language, which confirms, rather than refutes what I am saying in the post.

    I have researched the Greek for the word ‘Easter’ used in this passage and I can acknowledge it is Pascha.

    However, having acknowledged this, I’ll let it stand as the Bright translation, and allow the rest of what I wrote confirm what I said anyway.

    Which is, contextually, that the dates were changed to comply with the advent of Spring rather than to follow the Jewish Passover, which Constantine definitely says, claiming ‘it seemed very unworthy for us to keep this most sacred feast following the custom of the Jews, a people who have soiled their hands in a most terrible outrage, and have thus polluted their souls, and are now deservedly blind’ as his reason for changing the dates.

  19. That was a slightly confusing piece you put up on he meaning of Easter, Bones, in that it openly admitted, inadvertently, that most languages other than English use a direct derivative of the word pascha, but the English is Easter!

    So, then where does Easter come form should be the question.

    And what is the connection between Ester and bunnies and eggs should follow!

    So, again, your own evidence confirms what I am saying in the first place. It refutes nothing. It merely adds weight to the charge I make that Easter has replaced Pascha!

  20. ”Most Pentecostal churches have drums in their worship – in fact it is essential to get young people aroused. They are not Biblical”

    Ooh good, a fellow ‘drums-are-not-part-of-God’s-instruments’ believer. I have been waiting along time to meet you Bones.

  21. For instance, he says In Dutch, Easter is known as Pasen and in the Scandinavian languages Easter is known as påske (Danish and Norwegian), påsk (Swedish), páskar (Icelandic) and páskir (Faeroese).

    No it doesn’t at all. It actually says, or should say, ‘In Dutch, Pascha, or the Passover is known as Pasen and in the Scandinavian languages Easter is known as påske (Danish and Norwegian), påsk (Swedish), páskar (Icelandic) and páskir (Faeroese).’

    Astonishing!

  22. Your article is in error.

    Constantine would have used Latin/Greek (pascha) not English. Eastre was not used until the ninth century.

    There were arguments about the setting of Passover (which had always been in the spring equinox), when to celebrate Pascha and why are the Jews telling Christians when to celebrate pascha.

    Of course none of this has anything to do with Astarte which noone at Nicaea would have heard of!

  23. My article quotes a recognised translation.

    It is not in error at all. The basis of it remains accurate. It was not based on the translation of Constantine’s letter but on the inclusion of the word Easter in the AV.

    The translation is of Socrates who wrote in Greek. He uses the word Pascha, and I have acknowledged this.

    Do you say Easter, eggs, bunnies and the like relate to Christ’s death and resurrection?

    Where is Easter derived from? What relationship does it have with Pascha? None!

  24. You didn’t read all of Socrates article.

    Astonishing!

    It is truly most absurd for them [the Jews -sic] to boast that we are incapable of rightly observing these things without their instruction. On what subject are they competent to form a correct judgment, who, after that murder of their Lord lost their senses, and are led not by any rational motive, but by an uncontrollable impulsiveness to wherever their innate fury may drive them? This is why even in this matter they do not perceive the truth, so that they constantly err in the utmost degree, and will celebrate the Feast of Passover a second time in the same year instead of making a suitable correction. (6.) Why then should we follow the example of those who are acknowledged to be infected with serious error? Surely we should never allow Pascha [Easter] to be kept twice in one and the same year! But even if these considerations were not laid before you, you should still be careful, both by diligence and prayer, that your pure souls should have nothing in common, or even seem to do so, with the customs of men so utterly depraved.

    http://www.fourthcentury.com/urkunde-26/

  25. Easter, despite its pagan roots and association with the false goddess, had, through a mixture of religion, stealth and spiritual blindness, crept into the calendar of the early church, and, by the time of the Council of Nicaea, was already a part of the festival, although, up until this time it had been associated with the Jewish callendar, and celebrated according to dates of the Jewish Passover. However, this was changed by Constantine’s decree at Nicaea, and a fixed time was arranged.

    That has been proven false. The early church had nothing to do with goddesses in fact many had been tortured and persecuted during the reigns of Valerian and Diocletian for refusing to sacrifice to pagan gods from 253 to 311CE.

    According to a letter written by Dionysus during this time, “men and women, young and old, maidens and matrons, soldiers and civilians, of every age and race, some by scourging and fire, others by the sword, have conquered in the strife and won their crowns.” The persecution ended with the capture of Valerian by Persia. Valerian’s son and successor, Gallienus, revoked the edicts of his father.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persecution_of_Christians_in_the_Roman_Empire

    When did pascha’s pagan roots begin then?

  26. There is no direction in the New Testament to celebrate or even continue the Passover.

    We do, but it is not required. I think it is good to acknowledge the death and resurrection of Jesus and keep the allotted time, which corresponds to Jewish Passover, but we should also avoid mythologising it.

    This has clearly been done by associating it with pagan fertility rites. Denying this is pure ignorance of truth.

    The New Testament says we should not be judged in regard to holidays festivals feats, etc, but it also says we should avoid vain philosophies.

    The only thing we are asked to acknowledge is the death of the Lord Jesus as often as we meet, and this not on a specific day of the year, but anytime we meet as believers, and this, not as law, but as remembrance.

    When a feast is so blatantly mythologised and removes the essence of its meaning so far from the truth, to the extent of including the Spring fertility rites of another pagan institution I think we need to take a good look at what we are passing on to our children as Christians.

    In fact, it has already gone too far, and that is my point.

    To acknowledge your findings, I confess I can’t find what Constantine actually wrote, whether in Latin or Greek, only what Socrates reports, and what the translators give us, and I will make the correction, but I do know this, the institution of Easter was well encrypted into the Christian celebration.

    The proof is well and truly before us.

    Secondly, I am not, as you wickedly imply, attempting to say that Christianity is based on pagan beliefs. That is a lie. You must know that I am not saying this, yet you clearly say I do.

    I am saying that, in certain denominations, pagan religious beliefs have crept in, or been allowed to enter in, which are not true to Biblical standards.

    Easter is, despite your protestations, form one of two sources, Astarte, as most commentators agree, or Oestre, as others claim. Both are Spring fertility rites festivals. In reality, neither is different to the other and have the same pagan roots. Neither has the slightest thing to do with the death and resurrection of Christ.

    God says he will have no other god before him.

  27. “God says he will have no other god before him.”

    What, like money? How about what Brian “You Need More Money” Houston preaches? Do you think that it might be that Brian is right and God is wrong?

    How about success? All the boasting by certain pentecostal “movements” about how many churches they have and how many they’re going to plant, and how they are the best church in this city / this country / the world, and how they’ve got the best teaching and the greatest worship, and they’re more contemporary and hip and relevant, and how they have the ear of important people, and how they hob-nob with big business leaders, and how they’ve got the anointing, and how they pity the pathetic piety of those with a “poverty mindset”. All the triumphalism and the dominionism, all the high-minded haughtiness and the arrogance of those who are wise in their own eyes and who think that God is just the same as them.

    You know that idolatry is wrong, but you have no idea what it is – even when it is staring you right in the face. You have read the Bible but comprehended none of it – you have a head that’s full of knowledge and a heart that is devoid of understanding.

  28. W E Vines on pascha in the AV:
    ‘…mistranslated “Easter” in Acts 12:4, AV, denotes the Passover (RV). The phrase “after the Passover” signifies after the whole festival was at an end.

    The term “Easter” is not of Christian origin. It is another form of Astarte, one of the titles of the Chaldean goddess, the queen of heaven.

    The festival of Pasch held by Christians in post-apostolic times was a continuation of the Jewish feast, but was not instituted by Christ, nor was it connected with Lent. From this Pasch the pagan festival of “Easter” was quite distinct and was introduced into the apostate Western religion, as part of the attempt to adapt pagan festivals to Christianity.’

    Adam Clarke, in part, clears things up for us:

    Intending after Easter to bring him forth] meta to tasca, After the passover. Perhaps there never was a more unhappy, not to say absurd, translation than that in our text. But, before I come toexplain the word, it is necessary to observe that our term called Easter is not exactly the same with the Jewish passover. This festival is always held on the fourteenth day of the first vernal full moon; but the Easter of the Christians, never till the next Sabbath after said full moon; and, to avoid all conformity with the Jews in this matter, if the fourteenth day of the first vernal full moon happen on a Sabbath, then the festival of Easter is deferred till the Sabbath following. The first vernal moon is that
    whose fourteenth day is either on the day of the vernal equinox,
    or the next fourteenth day after it. The vernal equinox, according
    to a decree of the council of Nice, is fixed to the 21st day of
    March; and therefore the first vernal moon is that whose
    fourteenth day falls upon the 21st of March, or the first
    fourteenth day after. Hence it appears that the next Sabbath after the fourteenth day of the vernal moon, which is called the Paschal term, is always Easter day. And, therefore, the earliest Paschal term being the 21st of March, the 22d of March is the earliest Easter possible; and the 18th of April being the latest Paschal term, the seventh day after, that is the 25th of April, is the latest Easter possible.

    The term Easter, inserted here by our translators, they borrowed from the ancient Anglo-Saxon service-books, or from the version of the Gospels, which always translates the to pasca of the Greek by this term; e.g. #Mt 26:2|: Ye know that after two days is the feast of the passover. [Anglo-Saxon] Wite ye that aefter twam dagum beoth Eastro. #Mt 16:19|: And they made ready the passover. [Anglo-Saxon] And hig gegearwodon hym Easter thenunga (i.e. the paschal supper.) Prefixed to #Mt 28:1|, are these words: [Anglo-Saxon] This part to be read on Easter even. And, before #Mt 28:8|, these words: [Anglo-Saxon] #Mr 14:12|: And the first day of unleavened bread when they killed the passover. [Anglo-Saxon] And tham forman daegeazimorum, tha hi Eastron offrodon. Other examples occur in this version. Wiclif used the word paske, i.e. passover; but Tindal, Coverdale, Becke, and Cardmarden, following the old Saxon mode of translation, insert Easter: the Geneva Bible very properly renders it the passover. The Saxon [Anglo-Saxon] are different modes of spelling the name of the goddess Easter, whose festival was celebrated by our pagan forefathers on the month of April; hence that month, in the Saxon calendar, is called [Anglo-Saxon] Easter month. Every view we can take of this subject shows the gross impropriety of retaining a name every way exceptionable, and palpably absurd.

  29. I worship God every day, Bones.

    I attend a weekly church meeting on the first day of the week. I rest on the seventh.

    As I said earlier:

    Let no one judge you in food or in drink, or regarding a festival or a new moon or sabbaths, which are a shadow of things to come, but the substance is of Christ.

    So enjoy the bunnies and chocolate and eggs, but remember they have nothing whatsoever to do with the Passion of Christ.

  30. So you rest on Saturn’s day, you pagan you.

    When I look at an Easter egg, I shall think of the empty tomb and Jesus’s resurrection. I shall reflect on the new life and new birth ad how Jesus changed my life that the bunnies symbolise (not sure where the bilbies fit in yet), and when I eat the chocolate, I shall meditate on the fact that God’s presence is even sweeter still.

    And I shall think of you.

    And smile.

  31. I already ate my chocolate, thanks, Bones. I thought of it as chocolate! It was delicious! it was so good my wife and had to buy some more for supper!

    The chocolate eggs were dished out in church, along with little fluffy chick toys and an Easter message! 😀

    I thought of Christ, his death, his resurrection and new life quite apart from these props.

    Chocolate doesn’t give you eternal life, but it sure adds to the enjoyment.

    I didn’t think of you. Sorry!

  32. Well … I note that the whole eggs/rabbits thing definitely has nothing to do with the cricifixion and resurrection. However, I can’t stop my kids eating easter eggs and chocolate bunnies.

    It’s all I can do to stop eating the chocolate myself! That’s another 4 weeks in the gym otherwise.

    Anyhow, having said all that, I make sure they know that eggs and bunnies have nothing to do with Jesus.

  33. St. John Chrysostom: On Schismatics Over Calendar Issues

    In his third homily Against the Judaizers, Saint John Chrysostom (347-407), Archbishop of Constantinople, specifically addresses a schismatic group of his day which sought to try to appropriate the feasts and practices of the Jews into Christian practice. One of these practices was the attempt of some Judaizing Christians to celebrate Pascha according to the Jewish reckoning, despite the fact that the First Ecumenical Council established a moveable date of Pascha on which all Christians could celebrate in unison. Judaizers looked upon the First Ecumenical Council as an innovation of the Church that did not coincide with the early practices of the Christians. Despite the historical context of this homily, a close reading reveals a critique of schismatics in general, especially of schismatics who have separated from the church over issues dealing with the ecclesiastical calendar. When one reads this homily today, much of it could very well have been written today against Old Calendarist schismatics (eg Steve). Below are some excerpts from this homily:

    III

    When I have this to say against them, what argument of theirs will seem clever? They ask: “Did you not observe this fast before?” It is not your place to say this to me, but I would be justified in telling you that we, too, fasted at this time in earlier days, but still we put more importance on peace than on the observance of dates. And I say to you what Paul said to the Galatians: “Become like me, because I also have become like you.” What does this mean? He was urging them to renounce circumcision, to scorn the Sabbath, the feast days, and all the other observances of the Law. When he saw they were frightened and afraid that they might be subjected to chastisement and punishment for their transgression, he gave them courage by the example of his own actions when he said: “Become like me, because I also have become like you.”

    (2) For, he said, I did not come from the Gentiles, did I? I was not without experience of the Jewish way of life under the Law and the punishment set for those who transgress it, was I? “I am a Hebrew of the Hebrews; as regards the Law, a Pharisee; as regards zeal, a persecutor of the Church. But the things that were gain to me, these, for the sake of Christ, l counted loss.” That is, once and for all I stood aloof from them. Therefore, become like me, for I, too, was as you are….

    V

    (3) Therefore you must safeguard this exactness and vigor of spirit, not in the observance of the proper times but in your approach to the altar. Now you would elect to endure all things rather than change this practice. So, too, you must disdain it and choose to do or suffer anything so as not to approach the mysteries when you are burdened with sins.

    (4) Be sure that God takes no account of such observance of special seasons. Hear him as he passes judgment on those at his right hand: “You saw me hungry and gave me to eat; you saw me thirsty and gave me to drink; you saw me naked and you covered me.” But he charged with quite different conduct those on his left hand. At another time he brought forward another man in a parable and castigated him because He remembered the evil the man had done. For he said: “You wicked servant, I forgave you all the debt. Should not you then have had compassion also on your fellow servant, even as I had compassion on you?” Again, when the virgins had no oil in their lamps, he locked them out of the bride chamber. And he cast out another man who came into the feast without a wedding garment because this man was garbed in filthy clothes and was wearing the cloak of his fornication and uncleanness, But no one was ever punished or accused because he observed the Pasch in this or that month.

    (5) But why speak of ourselves since we have been set free from all such necessity? We are citizens of a city above in heaven, where there are no months, no sun, no moon, no circle of seasons. If you wish to give exact attention to the matter, you will see that, even among the Jews, little account was made of the season of the Pasch, but they cared greatly about the place for it, namely, Jerusalem….

    (6) And so is not the observance of the time annulled among the Jews so that the Pasch may be observed in Jerusalem? Will you not show greater concern for the harmony of the Church than for the season? So that you may seem to be observing the proper days, will you outrage the common Mother of us all and will you cut asunder the Holy Synod? How could you deserve pardon when you choose to commit sins so enormous for no good reason ?

    (7) But why must I speak of the Jews? No matter how eagerly and earnestly we wish it, it is not altogether possible for us to observe that day on which He was crucified….

    VI

    Let us not quarrel, let us not say: “After fasting these many years, am I to change now?” Change for that very reason. Since you have been so long severed from the Church, come back now to your Mother. No one says: “After I lived as her enemy so long a time, I am ashamed to be reconciled now.” You have grounds for shame if you do not change for the better but persist in your untimely contentiousness. That is what destroyed the Jews. While they always kept looking for the old customs and life, these were stripped from them and they turned to impiety.

    (2) But why do I speak of fasting and the observance of special days? Paul continued to observe the Law and to endure many a toil; he patiently put up with many journeys and hardships; he surpassed all his contemporaries in the exact observance of that way of life. But after he achieved the heights of that life and came to realize that he was doing all this for his own hurt and destruction, he immediately changed. He did not say to himself: “What is this? Am I to lose the reward for this great zeal of mine? Am I to waste all this work?” Rather he was the quicker to change for the very reason that he might continue to suffer that loss. He scorned justification by the Law so that he might receive the justification of faith. And so he loudly proclaimed: “The things that were gain to me I have counted as loss for Christ. And Christ said: “If you offer your gift at the altar, and there you remember that your brother has anything against you, go first and be reconciled to your brother and then come and offer your gift.”…

    (8) Why, then, do you sit beside a lamp after the sun has appeared? Why do you wish to nourish yourself on milk when solid food is being given to you? You were nourished with milk so that you might not remain satisfied with milk: the lamp shone for you that it might guide you and lead you by the hand into the light of the sun. Now that the era of more perfect things has come, let us not run back to the former times, let us not observe the days and seasons and years: rather, let us everywhere be careful to follow the Church by paying heed to charity and peace before all things.

    (9) Suppose the Church were to be tripped up and fall. The accurate computation of dates would not succeed in making her slip as much as this division and schism would deserve the blame. But I make no account of the exact date, since God makes no account of it, as I proved when I devoted many discourses to this subject. But the one thing I seek is that we do all things in peace and concord. If we do so, you will not stay home and get drunk while we are fasting with the rest of the people, and the priests are praying together for the whole world.

    (10) Note well that this is of the devil’s doing and that it is not a single sin, nor two, nor three, but far more than three. It cuts you off from the flock, it makes you ready to hold so many Fathers in scorn, it hurls you into contentiousness….

    (12) The Church does not recognize the exact observance of dates. In the beginning the Fathers decided to come together from widely separated places and to flux the Easter date; the Church paid respect to the harmony of their thinking. loved their oneness of mind, and accepted the date they enjoined. My earlier remarks have proved adequately that it is impossible for us or you or any other man to arrive at the exact date of the Lord’s day. So let us stop fighting with shadows, let us stop hurting ourselves in the big things while we are indulging our rivalry over the small….

    (14) I could have said much more than this. What I have said is enough for those who heed me; those who fail to heed my words will not be helped even if I should have much more to say. So let me finish my discourse at this point. and let us all pray together that our brothers come back to us. Let us pray that they cling fondly to peace and stand apart from untimely rivalry. Let us pray that they scorn this sluggish spirit of theirs and find a great and lofty understanding. Let us pray that they be set free from this observance of days so that all of us, with one heart and with one voice, may give glory to God and the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, to whom be glory and power now and forever, world without end. Amen.

    http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/chrysostom-jews6-homily3.asp

  34. Old Calendarist schismatics (eg Steve)

    ?????

    I’m just opposed to the use of feasts adoring Ash-toroth, or any variation, or other god, and utilising pagan emblems.

    I won’t judge a person in regard to a holiday, a feast day or a sabbath.

    Today is the day of salvation, and Today is the day we listen to God, worship God, praise God, and Today is the day we do not harden our hearts as Israel did and failed to enter His Rest, and Today is the day of Rest, the true Shabat of God, the place we enter through faith in Christ. Today is the only day that counts.

    As Jesus said, the sabbath serves us, we do not serve the sabbath.

    But who we honour through our festivals is important.

    You go ahead and worship your bunny goddess.

    I’ll stick to remembering what Jesus has done for us at the cross and resurrection.

  35. “I won’t judge a person in regard to a holiday, a feast day or a sabbath.”

    That would be quite correct, since “These are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ.”

    Is there anything else that belongs on the list of things you won’t judge people for? Something from the Old Testament law?

  36. Of course – meat and drink. I will not judge you in respect of what was, under the law, considered unclean, but has now been declared clean by God. And I will not judge you in respect of a specific day of the week on which you worship.

    But, should you choose to worship on a specific day, including the day that the Jews still consider holy unto the Lord, the Sabbath of the Mosaic Law, I will not judge you.

    1 Corinthians 6:12
    All things are lawful for me, but all things are not helpful. All things are lawful for me, but I will not be brought under the power of any.

    So, whatever you choose to do has a power to it. If you choose to worship on a certain day, or eat a certain food, or drink a certain drink in a certain way, or not eat or drink certain foods or drink, then it is lawful, but not always helpful.

    Nevertheless, I should not judge you in it or for it, but rather walk in love and live my life of liberty according to the understanding I have of the New Testament, since, if I determine that my way is the only way, and I impose my way on you, I am bringing you under subjection unwillingly to my law, and I make you a slave to that which I am in slavery to.

    However, I can show you by my lifestyle the truth, and I can let you know the truth, that I am free from meats and drinks and from ceremonial worship, and from a specific sabbath other than Today.

    As Paul says, if a person is not mature in the same area of liberty you are, in regard to, say, to meat offered to idols, even though you are free, you should abstain for the sake of that person, so that you do not stumble them in their faith in Christ over a minor issue such as meats offered to idols.

    However, it is then important to demonstrate the truth of being free from the law, and not allow a person to bind us again to the law which could never save, and to resist the legalists who attempt to drive us back into the law.

    In fact, Jesus says, “Judge not, and you will not be judged!” In this he declares that judging a person leads to the judgement of God, and of others who scrutinise your own judgment.

    Becoming a judge opens one up to judgment, in other words. It is a serious business, judgment.

    Finally, we do not wrestle against flesh and blood. We are not to contend with the Body, but with demonic forces which attempt to thwart the gospel.

    That is why proclaiming the truth is always greater than judging a man for error. Name the error, declare the truth, but do so according to God’s pattern, not according to a public trial.

  37. Apparently I worship the bunny goddess. Does that go for everyone who ears chocolate Easter eggs? Very JWish belief to me but I’m not surprised.

    Funny I’ve been thinking about 1 Corinthians 8 all day.

    8 Now concerning things sacrificed to idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge [a] makes arrogant, but love edifies. 2 If anyone supposes that he knows anything, he has not yet known as he ought to know; 3 but if anyone loves God, he is known by Him.

    4 Therefore concerning the eating of things sacrificed to idols, we know that [b]there is no such thing as an idol in the world, and that there is no God but one. 5 For even if there are so-called gods whether in heaven or on earth, as indeed there are many gods and many lords, 6 yet for us there is but one God, the Father, from whom are all things and we exist for Him; and one Lord, Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we exist through Him.

    7 However not all men have this knowledge; but some, being accustomed to the idol until now, eat food as if it were sacrificed to an idol; and their conscience being weak is defiled. 8 But food will not [c]commend us to God; we are neither [d]the worse if we do not eat, nor [e]the better if we do eat. 9 But take care that this [f]liberty of yours does not somehow become a stumbling block to the weak. 10 For if someone sees you, who have knowledge, dining in an idol’s temple, will not his conscience, if he is weak, be strengthened to eat things sacrificed to idols? 11 For through your knowledge he who is weak is ruined, the brother for whose sake Christ died. 12 And so, by sinning against the brethren and wounding their conscience when it is weak, you sin against Christ. 13 Therefore, if food causes my brother to stumble, I will never eat meat again, so that I will not cause my brother to stumble.

    I might give up eating Easter eggs. It might make my weaker brethren stumble who don’t have the knowledge that there is only one God – like Steve.

    That is of course if you accept that eggs are idolatrous. Which Paul would say there is no such thing anyway.

  38. You need to read the title, Bones, then you’ll see I have no problem with chocolate or Easter, just worshiping other gods, or goddesses.

    Have a nice day!

  39. The issue is the difference between knowledge and love. Knowledge puffs up, whilst love builds people up.

  40. So Steve, you won’t judge a person in regard to a holiday, a feast day or a sabbath, or in regards to meat and drink. That’s all very commendable.

    Anything else?

  41. I suppose you’re desperate to discuss your favourite subject – money, Zorro, so, no I won’t judge a man in regard to his financial giving, beit as a freewill offering, sowing, a tithe, or as nothing. It’s between him and God.

  42. I’m debt free. Does that count?

    I feel there was a mocking tone to your rhetorical question. Maybe you doubt God.

    But why do you have to personalise your approach?

  43. Just asking a question. I would have thought by now you would have prospered 30, 60 or 100 fold?

    Or is that still coming?

  44. I think you have your doctrine out of kilter, and you’re making some absurd assumptions. It’s very sad that this blog contains people who have to get off on aiming fiery darts at others.

    Mark 10
    28 Then Peter began to say to Him, “See, we have left all and followed You.”
    29 So Jesus answered and said, “Assuredly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or father or mother or wife or children or lands, for My sake and the gospel’s,
    30 “who shall not receive a hundredfold now in this time–houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions–and in the age to come, eternal life.
    31 “But many who are first will be last, and the last first.”

    This I hold to and have witnessed. God is true to his word.

    My affairs are between myself and the Lord. If you want the context of these scriptures read them, but don’t read more than is there into another person’s life. That is judgmental.

    You earn, I know, a fortune compared to the people I am working amongst, yet you judge me for things you have no idea about. What was it? $75,000 pa? Maybe you deserve it. God knows.

    And who set that up for you? Will you claim it to be in your own strength? You should be thankful and praise God for your great wealth.

    You are the rich one.

  45. Maybe you doubt God.

    Yeah. I have doubts. I’ll be honest about that. I identify with the centurion who asked Jesus “Lord, help my unbelief”.

    I suppose I wanted to know if you identify with prosperity teaching (the modern teaching that God will prosper you based on your giving) and if so how that teaching pans out for the non-millionaire pastor and the other poor sods busting their gut in ministry.

    (I’m not putting you down. I know how much work most ministers do and for every millionaire there are thousands who aren’t).

    My affairs are between myself and the Lord.

    True. I’m not judging you btw. I am judging that teaching. Like you have judged Catholic belief.

    You should be thankful and praise God for your great wealth.

    Sometimes, but there are things I would rather have than a bigger pay cheque.

  46. Well, giving is giving. You don’t expect reward for giving, otherwise it would be an exchange, or transaction, or selling, or trading. When you give it is released. You no longer have power over it. You have designated the authority and responsibility over what you give to the person or group you give it to.

    God has said that when you give it will be given back in some way, but that is still not the motive for giving, or it would not be giving. God has just said that giving will ultimately come around to you, too.

    Offerings would also be in this category, and the majority of what we bring into the local church would come under these headings. Giving is giving. Offering is offering.

    Then there are other places a person will give which are not directly connected with the local church or ministries, but are more towards those who lack or are suffering but are not yet saved. Out reach giving.

    Sowing, on the other hand, is a calculated transaction. A farmer doesn’t sow without first counting the cost of what he is sowing, when he sows, how he sows and where he sows, what he has to do to prepare the ground for sowing, and watching for the right conditions and season for sowing, with the expectation of a return.

    The reference to 30, 60 or 100 fold is totally in conjunction with farming for, say, a wheat or barley crop, where one seed sown yields many more harvested. It is a natural principle, and a sign that God is still seasonally involved with men’s affairs.

    Paul certainly mentions sowing and reaping in connection to finances, in particular with missions or mercy outreach, and that the sum reaped is in proportion to the amount sown. That was not contrived by so-called prosperity teachers. It was and is a Biblical principle alluded to by one of God’s apostles under the leading of the Holy Spirit.

    How you work with that premise is entirely up to you. Is the return reaped in this lifetime, or in the future, as an earthly reward, or as treasure stored up in heaven? Is it generational, or communal, or even national?

    I see it as seed sown which yields more seed to sow, specifically into the harvest for souls, which is certainly of our time and, potentially, of times to come.

    It has never been about me becoming rich, but about having contentment and sufficiency in all things, including the ability to sow more into the gospel to further the cause of Christ. Not that he lacks anything, or needs our money, but more that we worship through our contribution to his cause.

    Maybe you are looking at things in the wrong way, including how we ‘faith’ people discuss the financial side of things.

    All I know is that Paul also said that we would, in due season, reap, and so we should not lose hope or grow weary of doing good.

    Jesus’ response to your doubt is ‘only believe’.

  47. “[…] no I won’t judge a man in regard to his financial giving, beit as a freewill offering, sowing, a tithe, or as nothing. It’s between him and God.”

    What intrigues me is this: you understand that we are not under the OT law, and you therefore quite correctly refrain from judging others according to that law – and yet you have thrown in your lot with those who wish to selectively resurrect the law (what they call “tithing”). Not only this, but you also trenchantly defend those latter-day Judaizers, and even lionise them – going so far as to laud them as “men of God” (which they manifestly are not, since they preach a different gospel and have the unmitigated gall to condemn them as “robbers of God” and “accursed” who will not follow this thoroughly repugnant man-made rule of giving).

    You come across as a theological Jekyll and Hyde. Can you honestly not discern the disconnect?

  48. We all associate with whomever God sends us to, sometimes for reasons we may not comprehend, but, in the end, it is whee he places us. That in no way is an agreement with your assessment, but an explanation of why we sometimes work amongst those who have different views, because, ultimately, who has the same views anyway?

    I started with the Anglicans. They gave me the left hand of fellowship because I was filled with the Spirit and spoke in tongues, and was shunted to the back of the church out of the way, and because I held a prayer meeting in my own home for local people. Do I blame them? No. Do I love them? Of course. Would we have continued with them had we been accepted as we were? Naturally, despite the differences, because we were originally placed there.

    Yes. I am, in part, still of their group, and was, for a season, influential amongst them in my town, as an effective evangelist. When the Holy Spirit got hold of my wife and I and we were filled, which was a game changer for the church we were in, we were edged out into a charismatic church. Were they perfect? No. Were we? No.

    There is only one Body. Where we are placed is in God’s hands. Where we are placed and accepted as being amongst the brethren in the Beloved.

    Do you agree with reformed theology’s assertion that God has destined before time that people are born for the Lake of Fire? A monstrous doctrine. Yet you associate, and even laud those who propose it.

    Do you hold with their dodgy teaching on ‘whosoever’, which completely denies the truth that Jesus died once and for all?

    Yet you still fellowship with them, and even promote their teaching.

    What is worse? Teaching that giving a tenth is a requirement of faith, or that someone’s sister might have to go to the Lake of Fire because God has not included them in the elect?

    When someone’s got it all together on doctrine let me know.

    Until then, I’ll allow God to place me where he wants me, and if I can bring any kind of change, by his will, then let it be so.

  49. That’s a reply that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking Steve, so I’m not going to respond straight away; I will instead give it the consideration that it deserves.

  50. As you do not know the path of the wind, or how the body is formed in a mother’s womb, so you cannot understand the work of God, the Maker of all things.

    The wind blows to the south and turns to the north; round and round it goes, ever returning on its course.

    A Common Destiny for All

    9 So I reflected on all this and concluded that the righteous and the wise and what they do are in God’s hands, but no one knows whether love or hate awaits them. 2 All share a common destiny—the righteous and the wicked, the good and the bad,[a] the clean and the unclean, those who offer sacrifices and those who do not.

    As it is with the good,
    so with the sinful;
    as it is with those who take oaths,
    so with those who are afraid to take them.
    3 This is the evil in everything that happens under the sun: The same destiny overtakes all. The hearts of people, moreover, are full of evil and there is madness in their hearts while they live, and afterward they join the dead. 4 Anyone who is among the living has hope[b]—even a live dog is better off than a dead lion!

    5 For the living know that they will die,
    but the dead know nothing;
    they have no further reward,
    and even their name is forgotten.
    6 Their love, their hate
    and their jealousy have long since vanished;
    never again will they have a part
    in anything that happens under the sun.
    7 Go, eat your food with gladness, and drink your wine with a joyful heart, for God has already approved what you do. 8 Always be clothed in white, and always anoint your head with oil. 9 Enjoy life with your wife, whom you love, all the days of this meaningless life that God has given you under the sun—all your meaningless days. For this is your lot in life and in your toilsome labor under the sun. 10 Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might, for in the realm of the dead, where you are going, there is neither working nor planning nor knowledge nor wisdom.

    11 I have seen something else under the sun:

    The race is not to the swift
    or the battle to the strong,
    nor does food come to the wise
    or wealth to the brilliant
    or favor to the learned;
    but time and chance happen to them all.
    12 Moreover, no one knows when their hour will come:

    As fish are caught in a cruel net,
    or birds are taken in a snare,
    so people are trapped by evil times
    that fall unexpectedly upon them.
    Wisdom Better Than Folly

    13 I also saw under the sun this example of wisdom that greatly impressed me: 14 There was once a small city with only a few people in it. And a powerful king came against it, surrounded it and built huge siege works against it. 15 Now there lived in that city a man poor but wise, and he saved the city by his wisdom. But nobody remembered that poor man. 16 So I said, “Wisdom is better than strength.” But the poor man’s wisdom is despised, and his words are no longer heeded.

    17 The quiet words of the wise are more to be heeded
    than the shouts of a ruler of fools.
    18 Wisdom is better than weapons of war,
    but one sinner destroys much good.

  51. The other thing is that Jesus gave us a new commandment, which identifies us as His disciples.

    John 13
    34 “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another.
    35 “By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another.”

    How do I love you if I constantly criticise you; if I only call you the ugliest things; if I publicly denounce you even though you heartily believe what you understand of the Bible in a different way?

    If the doctrine is wrong then we can point out the error, of course. I owe it to you to show you plainly what the truth is, but not to call you a fool. That makes me no better that the one in error, because, in itself, it is error. All error is equally error. There are no degrees of error.

    If the gospel is deliberately false and misleading to people then we call the perpetrators anathema. If you attempt to drag me into Moses I can say that will never do, and I will not go, but I do not have the right to denounce you if you are merely mislead in your error.

    Philippians 2
    14 Do all things without complaining and disputing,
    15 that you may become blameless and harmless, children of God without fault in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world,
    16 holding fast the word of life, so that I may rejoice in the day of Christ that I have not run in vain or labored in vain.

    Well, that is very difficult if you set yourself up as the judge and jury of another man’s ministry.

    Without fault! As soon as I judge you I display my own errors and open myself to your scrutiny. I leave the security of mercy and open the door to your fiery darts, because I put down my shield of faith to mark yours. I stop trusting God to deal with your error, and forget my own.

    Where does God give us license to tear up the Body? All I see is the command to love the brethren, and to carefully, and circumspectly show a man the errors of his ways if we see he has strayed.

    Galatians 6
    1 ¶ Brethren, if a man is overtaken in any trespass, you who are spiritual restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness, considering yourself lest you also be tempted.
    2 Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.
    3 For if anyone thinks himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceives himself.
    4 But let each one examine his own work, and then he will have rejoicing in himself alone, and not in another.
    5 For each one shall bear his own load.
    6 Let him who is taught the word share in all good things with him who teaches.
    7 Do not be deceived, God is not mocked; for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap.

    Too many of us, sadly, think more of ourselves than we ought to think, and fall into the same snare we accuse others of being trapped in instead of helping them out.

    If we’d spend more time examining or own work before we determine it is pertinent to point out another’s work, we would realise that we have much deal with before we even qualify to judge others.

    But, if we have something against another, we should do it the way Paul did with Peter. “Now when Peter had come to Antioch, I withstood him to his face, because he was to be blamed.” To his face, not through some other face, or a crowd or an audience.

    Oh my. That last word; ‘audience’. How many times have we denied a man or woman of God the love that Christ speaks of when we have criticised them unjustly to or through an audience?

  52. You realise that to shoot off fiery darts requires two hands, so you have to put down the shield of faith and sheath the sword of the Word to fire flaming darts at your target, which means all dart aimers have put away faith and the Word to do their dirty work.

    Those darts are called the darts of the wicked one. They do not come from God.

    How often has anyone here, myself included, been guilty of having a good reason for using the sword of the Spirit, but, instead, took up the crossbow of the wicked one to fire off the blame and shame it delivers?

    And how often have you seen them fired off into the unguarded back of someone from a distance?

    Take up the sword and shield!

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